Headset dent: should you worry about it?

We’ve all been there. You’re using your headphones, and you feel like you have a dent in your head. It’s not a headache, but it’s uncomfortable, and you’re not sure what to do about it. Is this something to worry about? Should you be concerned about a headset dent? This article will talk about what can cause a headset dent and what you can do to prevent it.

Headset dent or headphone dent – is it real?

We have all been there. You are using your headphones, and you feel like you have a dent in your head. You walk to the mirror to check, and you have a dent in your head! Paranoia kicks in because you’ve never noticed it before. Surely this can’t be normal, right?

Wrong. This is a pretty common occurrence, and it’s nothing to worry about. The dent is most likely caused by the pressure of the headphones on your skin. This is more common with big, heavy headphones such as the around-ear headphones or over-ear headsets with microphones integrated.

Yes, it’s real. And no, it’s not a dent in your skull. When you wear headphones, they put pressure on the skin and cause a temporary indentation. The good news is that this is not permanent, and the dent will go away within a few hours.

headphone dent

In many cases, it’s not even a dent in your skin. It’s more likely to be a hair dent. When you wear headphones, your hair can often get caught in the band or ear cups and cause a slight indentation. This dent is more common with some hair types than others.

So, should you worry about a headset dent?

No, there is no need to worry about a headset dent. This is a common occurrence, and it’s nothing to worry about. The dent is most likely due to the pressure of the headphones on your skin or hair, and it will go away within a few hours.

There might be a few exceptions, though. Let’s quickly go over them.

When should you be worried about a dent?

There are a few cases when you might want to be concerned about a headset dent. If the dent is accompanied by pain, swelling, or redness, then you should consult a doctor.

Another time to be concerned would be if the dent does not go away within a few hours and you realize you have a real dent in your skull (not skin or hair). This could be very serious, and you should consult a doctor immediately.

A few reasons why you might have a skull dent are:

  • Congenital skill indentation
  • Paget’s disease of bone
  • Gorham’s disease

If you’re not sure about that dent in your skull, it’s always best to consult a doctor.

How to avoid the headphone/headset dent?

You can do a few things to avoid getting a headset dent other than reducing the amount of time you spend wearing headphones.

If you must wear headphones for long periods, try to:

Wear a hat under the headphones

Another solution is to wear a hat under your headphones to distribute the pressure and prevent a headset dent from happening.

However, regularly using a hat can cause hat hair, and that’s another whole issue to deal with.

headset dent - wear a hat

Use headphones that go over the back of your head

Easy solution. This will help distribute the pressure more evenly and prevent a headset dent from occurring. Your head might feel relieved too!

Adjust your headband

If you have headband-style headphones, make sure it’s not too tight. This will also help distribute the pressure more evenly and prevent a headset dent.

People who have headaches or migraines often find that wearing headphones with loose headbands can help to relieve the pain.

Use lighter headphones or earbuds

If you find that you’re getting a lot of headaches or you’re concerned about the pressure on your skin, try using lighter headphones or earbuds. This will help reduce the strain on your head and prevent a headset dent from occurring.

headset dent - earbuds

There are a ton of great earbuds in the market these days, and they are often much cheaper than headphones, come in different types and styles both wired and Bluetooth.

Be patient. The dent will go away on its own

If you do get a headset dent, don’t worry! It’s not permanent, and it will go away on its own within a few hours. Be patient and avoid wearing headphones for long periods until the dent goes away.

You can also wet your hair or take a shower to help the dent go away faster.

The bottom line

There’s no need to worry about a headset dent. This is a common occurrence, and it’s nothing to worry about. The dent is most likely due to the pressure of the headphones on your skin or hair, and it will go away within a few hours. If you’re concerned about the strain on your head, try using lighter headphones or earbuds.

And if you do get a headset dent, just be patient, and it will go away on its own! Remember, the dent shouldn’t hurt, swell, or cause redness. If it does, please consult a doctor.

Leave a Comment